In the News: Expert Reveals How to Slash Calories, Fitness Trackers May Not Be Accurate, Company Pays Employees to Adopt Cats

Expert reveals how to slash calories. Nutritionist Kristin Kirkpatrick has come up with seven ways to cut calories effectively. She recommends cutting out sugars and creamers from your daily coffee, not getting carried away with healthy fats, de-graining your favorite grain dishes, cooking more as opposed to eating takeout, choosing a healthy breakfast instead of pastries and cereal, give up alcohol for six weeks, and swap starchy sides for greens. Want to know your calorie type? Take this quiz to find out. (TODAY)

Fitness trackers may not be accurate. Fitness trackers of all kinds have become extremely popular in recent years, allowing users to track calories, fat burn, steps taken, and more. While many people assume this data is 100% accurate, as it turns out the measurements are often slightly off. Cardiologist Euan Ashley, an associate professor of medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center set out to analyze this data and determine how trustworthy it really is. Tracking heart rate and calories burned, they found that the former was very accurate, and only off by around 5% if at all. When measuring the calorie burn however, they found that the trackers were off 20-93% of the time. These findings go to show that you should reference your calorie burn numbers but avoid using them to determine how much you eat. (NPR)

Company pays employees to adopt cats. Ferray, an IT firm in Tokyo, is encouraging employees to bring their own cats to the office and also offering an incentive to those who rescue one. The head of Ferray, Hidenobu Fukuda has promised to give 5,000 yen (around $45) a month to employees who rescue a cat. Since 2000, Fukuda has been allowing employees to bring their cats in, with nine cats currently hanging out in the office on a regular basis. As cute as this story is, it turns out that there is a practical reason for this policy as well. The hope is that a cat-friendly workplace will help lower stress, improve mood, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and fight loneliness. (HUFFPO)