In the News: Interesting Vegetable Names Make Them More Appealing, One in Ten People Obese Worldwide, Drug Can Create a Tan Without the Sun

Interesting vegetable names make them more appealing. It turns out that the key to getting people to eat their vegetables has more to do with the marketing than the vegetable itself. Stanford University researchers discovered that students were consuming more vegetables in the cafeteria when the names were given an upgrade. The experiment, which lasted throughout the fall semester, involved tracking how many of the 600 diners chose a given vegetable dish. The vegetables were given four different labels: Basic (simply naming the vegetable), Healthy Restrictive (vegetable with sugar-free dressing), Healthy Positive (vitamin C packed vegetable), and Indulgent (citrus-glazed twisted vegetable). As it turns out, 25% more students chose the vegetable with the indulgent name versus the basic one, 41% more people chose the healthy restrictive ones, and 35% more people chose the healthy positive labels. Want to add more vegetables to your diet? Start with these. (BBC)

One in ten people on Earth is obese.  According to a report out of the New England Journal of Medicine, one in 10 people across the globe were labeled obese in 2015, which amounts to 604 million adults and 108 million children. The country with the highest rate of child obesity was the United States coming in at 12.7%, while the country with the highest rate of obese adults was in Egypt at 35.3%. When analyzing these numbers, many point to a change in employment as an explanation. Many countries have switched from physical labor to more sedentary office jobs. Obesity accounted for four million deaths around the world, 70% of which were linked to heart disease. Even scarier, 39% of deaths were from individuals who were overweight, not obese. Want to lose weight? Try the 21-Day Weight Loss Breakthrough diet. (CBS)

Drug that creates a tan may prevent cancer. Love having a sun-kissed look but hate exposing yourself to dangerous rays? It looks like science is now on your side. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital  have found that a drug can fool the skin into producing melanin, even working on redheads, who typically only get sunburnt. When the drug is rubbed on the skin it causes the skin to darken, the way it would normally when exposed to the sun. When examined up close, scientists found that the melanin production was genuine, which is an exciting development in the world of sunless tanning. While many rely on spray tans, airbrush tans, and tan towels to achieve a summer glow, these services have also come into question, thanks to the potentially harmful ingredients inside them. While further research will be required to determine that there are no harmful side-effects, so far this drug is showing a lot of promise. Want to learn how to make your skin look its best? Try this seven second skin care routine. (BBC)