In the News: Older Fathers May Have ‘Geekier’ Sons, Airplane Coffee and Tea May Be Full of Bacteria, Centenarians Share Secrets to Longevity

Older fathers may have ‘geekier’ sons. According to a “Geek Index”, created by King’s College London, men who wait longer to start a family may have “geekier” sons. A team of scientists analyzed test results from 15,000 twins, noting their non-verbal IQ, ability to focus on a subject, and social aloofness.  They found that the boys who scored high were brighter, more focused, and less worried about fitting in. Interestingly, they discovered that the age of the mother played no role in these results, and that daughters of older fathers were immune to these traits. When looking for an answer, researchers point out that new sperm mutations may be in play, as well as the fact that older men may simply encourage geeky traits thanks to their lifestyles.  (BBC)

Airplane coffee and tea may be full of bacteria. Do you find yourself ordering a cup of coffee or tea on a flight? You may want to rethink this beverage choice.  When asked which beverages they never go for on planes, stewardesses admitted they refuse to drink coffee, tea, or hot water. As it turns out, they may have the right idea. The water used for these warm beverages comes from the tap as opposed to a bottle, and that tap water may be full of horrible germs. One study found that in 158 airplanes, 13% were found to have coliform and two airplanes were even found to have E.coli in their tap water. An astounding one in every eight planes does not even pass the standards of water safety. To avoid ingesting potentially dangerous strains of bacteria, simply opt for bottled water or bring your own and save your caffeine fix for after you land. Here are eight more tricks to stay healthy while traveling. (T+L)

Centenarians share their secrets to longevity. As more and more people are reaching 100 years of age and up, scientists are looking into the secret behind their longevity. When asked how they maintain their youthful energy at the ages of 104 and 102, John and Charlotte Henderson point to a few key factors: eating well, sleeping enough, not drinking too much, having a loving partner, not overeating, and making time to exercise consistently. Another factor that plays a role is genetics. When Mac Miller, 102 years old, was asked how he’s stayed alive and healthy this long, he explained “my grandparents were in their 80s, my mother was 89, and my father was 93.” So it looks like a blend of behavioral factors, genetics, and today’s improved healthcare have led to an increase in the number of centenarians in the U.S. Want to stay on top of your longevity regimen? Check out this handy checklist. (USAT)