In the News: Restful Sleep Can Dramatically Improve Mood, New Cholesterol Drug Can Reduce Risk of Heart Disease, CDC Ranks Most Sleep-Deprived Jobs

Counting sheep might be as good as counting cash. A good night’s sleep feels like winning the lottery. Ever notice that quality rest and relaxation makes you feel like a million bucks? Well, researchers at the University of Warwick followed thousands of British participants for four years and found that you’re not alone. People who reported improved quality of sleep or reduced usage of sleep medications had four year mood boosts comparable to lottery winners a couple years out from their big payoff. The scientists think it’s because sleep can have such a profound effect on both our physical and emotional health. Check out Dr. Oz’s favorite tips on getting better sleep. (TIME)

Breakthrough drug gives docs a change of heart. New cholesterol drug can protect patients most at risk for heart disease. A new cholesterol drug, Evolocumab is an injectable antibody that can lower lousy LDL cholesterol to unnaturally low levels according to a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Participants in the study experienced a 15 percent decrease in their risk of cardiovascular events like heart attack and stroke. Although it’s only used for patients with the highest risk of heart disease, the study provides hope that we may soon have more effective ways to cut CVD risk in the future. Watch Dr. Oz and a team of cardiologists discuss one of the most common treatments for cholesterol, statins. (NYTIMES)

Have your dream job? You should keep dreaming. CDC ranks the most sleep deprived occupations. Multiple sleep research organizations say that less than seven hours of snoozing has been linked to issues like heart disease, obesity, and depression. Many experts think sleep deprivation may have something to do with our jobs. To find out how many of us are missing out on beauty rest, the CDC conducted a survey of American adults and found out which jobs get the least amount of sleep. They found that the worst offenders were communications equipment operators but several others made the list including health-care workers, firefighters, and transportation workers. The authors suggest we need to fix our poor sleep habits to improve our health. Find out your own sleep score today. (CBS)