In the News: Solar Eclipse Safety Tips Revealed, Anger May Improve Happiness, Singing May Improve Parkinson’s Symptoms

Solar eclipse safety tips revealed.  As the anticipation grows for the upcoming solar eclipse, many are wondering how to safely witness this phenomenon. With so many people planning to wear their regular sunglasses or to buy counterfeit pairs it’s important to get the facts and stay protected. According to Steven Pfriem from the ICS Laboratories, the way to tell if your solar eclipse-viewing glasses are safe is to check for the “ISO 12312-2 standard” label on the frames, check that you can’t see your hand while you’re wearing the glasses, and make sure there are no bubbles, creases, dents, or scratches on the glasses themselves. (TODAY)

Anger can improve happiness. While it may sound strange to say that anger and hatred can somehow improve one’s happiness, research shows that this may be true. An international study found that happiness is more complicated than seeking to feel good and avoiding feeling bad. In actuality, feeling the emotions you desire to feel, even if those are negative, can boost your happiness. Some interesting findings showed that 11% of participants want to feel less positive emotions and 10% want to feel more negative ones. To make sense of this, Dr. Maya Tamir from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem explains that people who read horrible news want to feel sad or angry rather than feeling nothing. Researchers also found that expecting to feel happy constantly can have serious downsides since it’s natural to have an ebb and flow of emotions. (BBC)

Singing may improve Parkinson’s symptoms. A new study has found that singing may be used as a voice therapy to help Parkinson’s patients. While symptoms differ from person to person, 60-80% of people with Parkinson’s experience some type of vocal change such as becoming monotone, speaking in a whispered voice, or losing vocal pitch. While typical Parkinson’s treatments don’t cover this area, singing, a form of voice therapy, may help improve these impairments. In one study, researchers found that in two months of singing, volume, swallow control, and pitch were noticeably improved. While further research is required to determine how and why this practice can improve these symptoms, for the time-being it is showing great potential. (MN)