In the News: Marriage Linked to Lower Risk of Dementia, Nearly Half of Cancer Cases Are Within Our Control, Dog Owners May Live Longer

Marriage linked to lower risk of dementia. A new paper in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry by researchers from University College London found that people who are unmarried or widowed are at increased risk of developing dementia compared to married people. The review found that people who had never married were 42 percent more likely to develop dementia compared to married people, and widows and widowers were 20 percent more likely. The analysis used evidence from 15 previously published studies involving more than 800,000 people in Europe, North and South America and Asia. The question of why this is might be explained by similar studies, which show that people with spouses tend to be healthier than those without them. The researchers analyzed that married couples may motivate each other to exercise, eat healthfully, maintain social ties and smoke and drink less—all things that are associated with a lower risk for dementia. Check out this fact sheet to learn more about this disease. (T) 

Nearly half of cancer cases are within our control. In a study published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, researchers at the American Cancer Society calculated how much risk factors for cancer are within a person’s control. The study analyzed national cancer data and calculated how much of cancer cases and deaths can be attributed to factors that people can change; these included smoking, being overweight or obese, drinking too much alcohol, eating red and processed meats, not exercising, six cancer-related infections (including HPV), and more. Among more than 1.5 million cancers in 2014, 42 percent were traced to these factors, as well as 45 percent of deaths in that year. Researchers say that this should be seen as encouraging overall since it supports the idea that a good proportion of cancer cases and deaths can possibly be avoided. The hope is that these findings will encourage local, state and federal lawmakers to support more policies that reduce these risk factors, such as creating smoke-free areas and encouraging physical exercise. (T)

Dog owners may live longer. A Swedish study suggests that owning a dog is linked to a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death. The study, published in Scientific Reports, used demographic data on 3.4 million Swedes ages 40 to 80, and found that owning a dog was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of death and a 23 percent lower risk of death specifically from cardiovascular disease. These results were found through the Swedish Board of Agriculture, as all dogs in Sweden must be registered and identified by number with an ear tattoo or an implanted chip. Interestingly, the effect seemed to be stronger with certain breeds, particularly pointers and retrievers. Researchers suggested that this may reflect different kinds of owners, as owning an athletic dog might be good motivation to go out and exercise, as well as providing social support. (NYT)

In the News: Leaving the House Daily Can Help Seniors Live Longer, Cinnamon Oil May Trigger Fat Burn, Cold and Flu Drug May Halt Cancer Growth

Leaving the house daily can extend seniors’ lives. A study that was recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has found that two million senior citizens rarely or never leave the house, most often due to mobility issues and other physical difficulties. Aside from having a negative impact on their physical health, staying cooped up all the time can cause damage to their mental health as well. Being confined to the house at all times can cause anxiety, depression, and mental illness. In the study, 3,375 adults between 70 and 90 years were assessed, and they found that seniors who left their homes every day had the lowest risk of death and those who rarely ever left the house had the highest risk. For more longevity tips, check out this list.(MN)

Cinnamon oil may trigger fat burn. New research from the University of Michigan indicates that cinnamaldehyde, the oil that gives cinnamon its trademark flavors, may encourage calorie burn and enhance fat metabolism. After testing on mice, they found promising results, though it’s still too early to know how this ingredient will impact people and how much is needed. While a sprinkle of cinnamon on top of oatmeal or coffee may not do the trick, experts speculate that eating it every day in one way or another can eventually have metabolic benefits. Want to learn more about adding cinnamon to your diet? Here are six surprising uses for this magic spice. (T)

Cold and flu drug may halt cancer cells. Researchers have found that N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a common FDA-approved cold and flu medicine, may stop the growth of cancer cells by starving them of certain of proteins. When looking for an explanation, they found that NAC has antioxidant properties and that previous research showed tumors, particularly breast cancer tumors, had high levels of oxidative stress. When the tumor cells are exposed to this type of stress, they actually release a form of nutrients that cancer needs to go and thrive. With that in mind, they looked to NAC as a means of starving the cells and thus halting their development. These results show the potential for an affordable, everyday medication to stop cancer growth without the use of toxic treatments. (MN)

The Important Cancer Screening Test You Need to Know About

No smoking

We recently asked viewers, both online and in our studio audience, which cancer they think kills the most women. Here is what everyone thought:

  • Breast cancer – 33%
  • Ovarian cancer – 23%
  • Lung cancer – 21%
  • Cervical cancer -15%
  • Colon cancer – 7%
  • Endometrial cancer – 1%

The correct answer is actually lung cancer.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both women and men in the United States and around the world. Here in America, lung cancer claims over 155,000 lives every year. We all know the habit that boosts your risk the most, which hopefully you’re not doing, but what most people don’t know is that there is now a screening test for lung cancer that can literally save your life. In fact, the results of a new survey from the American Lung Association found that 84 percent of people at a high risk for lung cancer didn’t even know there was a screening test. Well, that changes today.

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Inside NXIVM: The Self-Help Group Where Women Are Branded and Recruited As Slaves

Coach and support group during psychological therapy

Today, we’re digging into a ‘self-help’ sorority that allegedly requires naked photos for admission, brands members with a medical instrument and urges them to follow a near-starvation diet. These are the shocking allegations I’ve recently learned about a group that’s long been at the center of controversy. That group is NXIVM. Based in Albany, it was founded in 1998 by Keith Raniere, promises to take participants on a journey of personal discovery and development. Some former followers claim the man who sells enlightenment is really pitching something else, so I travel to upstate New York to investigate.

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Sharon Tate’s Sister Reacts to the Death of Charles Manson

crime scene tape with blurred forensic law enforcement background in cinematic tone and copy spaceOn the surface, the Manson Family appeared to be happy, peace-loving hippies, yet despite their harmless demeanor, they were responsible for the murders of nine innocent people. Their leader, Charles Manson has been called, “the most dangerous man alive.” The most famous of the Manson killings was starlet Sharon Tate. The slaying of the movie star shook Hollywood to its core and left the county in fear—marking the end of the 60’s love-and-peace era.

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In the News: Spit Test May Detect Concussions, PTSD Often Follows Cancer Diagnosis, Proteins in Breast Milk May Prevent Allergies

Spit test may detect concussions. According to a study published in the JAMA Pediatrics, a saliva analysis may reveal if someone has a concussion and determine how long their symptoms may last. With youth concussions on the rise over the last several years, this discovery could help diagnose the injury early on and determine a more accurate treatment plan. In a study of concussed children, teens, and young adults, researchers identified five molecules known as microRNAs in the saliva, which impact protein functions in the body, and found that they can predict which children would have symptoms 30-days out with 85 percent accuracy, compared to 65 percent accuracy when using a standard survey to assess the condition. Want to learn more about concussions? Take a look at this fact sheet. (CNN)

PTSD often follows a cancer diagnosis. Research out of the National University of Malaysia in Bangi has found that many people diagnosed with cancer also develop PTSD and may continue to have this condition after their cancer subsides. Lead study author, Caryn Mei Hsien Chan, Ph.D., evaluated 469 adults who had been diagnosed with various types of cancer. They were assessed for PTSD symptoms six months following their diagnosis, and again four years later. At the six-month mark, Chan and her team found that participants had a 21.7 percent incidence of PTSD symptoms, and that dropped to 6.1 percent at the four-year check-up. However, one-third of the participants diagnosed before showed constant and/or worsening signs of this condition at that point. These findings highlight the importance of screening for PTSD in cancer patients early in the process to allow for maximum treatment and healing. If you want to learn more about PTSD, here are the important facts. (MN)

Proteins in breast milk may prevent allergies. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical Study have found that exposing egg to the breast milk of mothers during pregnancy and breastfeeding may prevent egg allergies in newborns. In this study, which was conducted on mice, they found that the newborns were given the most allergy protection when their mothers were exposed to eggs before and during pregnancy and breastfeeding, as opposed to just being exposed to eggs during pregnancy but then not going on to breastfeed. In another study, it was discovered that feeding peanut-filled foods to babies at an increased risk of peanut allergies actually decreased the odds of developing a peanut allergy. Allergy specialists are now recommending that expectant mothers do not avoid typical allergy foods (milk, nuts, eggs) during pregnancy and breastfeeding, assuming they do not have those allergies themselves. (SD)

What You Need to Know About Olivia Newton-John’s Natural Breast Cancer Treatments

breast-cancer-hands

On today’s show, Dr. Oz sat down with Olivia Newton-John to talk about her breast cancer recurrence.  The world-renowned singer and actress was treated for breast cancer 25 years ago and discovered this past spring that it had returned when a painful metastasis was found in her sacrum. She had radiation treatment which relieved her pain and is on a regimen of natural herbs and minerals, including a mix of strains of medical cannabis selected for her by her husband Amazon John Easterling.

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Online Marketers Found Guilty of Peddling Fake Skincare Ads Using Dr. Oz and Other Celeb Names

Student's finger on trackpad of computer.

The Federal Trade Commission has found a group of online marketers guilty of publishing deceptive dietary supplement and skincare advertisements after they sold over 40 health and beauty products using unsavory practices. With a combination of false health claims, made-up testimonials, deceptive ‘free trials’, fake websites like “goodhousekeepingtoday.com” and “womenshealthi.com,” and the unauthorized use of celebrity images – including Dr. Oz, Jennifer Aniston, and Paula Deen – the defendants tricked consumers into spending around $179 million over the course of five years.

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