What You Need to Know About Heart Failure

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Some 6.5 million Americans are living with heart failure, and nearly a million new cases are diagnosed each year. Despite its prevalence, heart failure symptoms are largely under-recognized, in part because people don’t understand the condition. Find out more about heart failure, and the warnings signs you should be mindful of here.

What is heart failure?

Heart failure is a serious, chronic condition in which the heart muscle is weakened and cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs for blood and oxygen. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. Heart failure is sometimes described as having a weak heart.

Heart failure is also associated with a lower five-year survival rate following hospital discharge than some cancers (e.g., breast cancer in women and bowel cancer in men). Read more  »

Nutrients You Need to Support Bone Health

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Written By Austin Winegar, AsktheScientists.com

Even though a variety of nutrients support and maintain bone health, calcium usually gets the most attention. Calcium is essential, but the health of your bones don’t depend on it alone. In fact, magnesium and vitamin D help your body absorb calcium better so it can actually use what you’re taking in. The combination of magnesium and calcium also provides benefits to the body beyond bone health—supporting your heart, muscles, healthy energy metabolism, and more.

Let’s take a look at each of these important nutrients.

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Melanoma Awareness Month: Top Prevention Tips

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Written by: Dr. Zeena Al-Dujaili

On average, one American dies from melanoma every hour. This disease claims the lives of 10,000 Americans every year, but when it is caught early, survival rates can be more than 90 percent. Although the risk of melanoma increases with age, it is also the most common cancer in young women in their 20s and 30s. Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that results from blistering sunburns in childhood and regular, unprotected sun exposure. Melanoma accounts for only about 1 percent of skin cancers, but results in a large majority of skin cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

May is Melanoma Awareness Month, so, this is the perfect time to go over the key points in detecting and preventing melanoma.

It is important that you have a dermatologist check your skin once a year and that you perform monthly self–skin checks. Make sure to check for a funny-looking spot or a change in your skin. When performing a skin check, it is useful to follow the ABCDEs of mole evaluation, looking for Asymmetry, Border irregularity, Color variation, change in Diameter larger than 6mm, and Evolution or change in appearance. Melanoma is most likely to present itself on the backs of men and the legs of women, but it can also occur in non-sun-exposed areas, such as the scalp, on the bottoms of the feet or in the eye.

Those with fair skin and a family history of melanoma are most at risk for the disease. It is important to protect yourself by wearing sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher, sunglasses, and protective clothing. Also, avoiding peak sun hours (10 AM–2 PM) and UV tanning beds is important in the prevention of melanoma. Studies have demonstrated that women younger than 30 are six times more likely to develop melanoma if they tan indoors. Research has also demonstrated that even people who do not burn after indoor tanning or sun exposure are at an increased risk of melanoma if they tan indoors. While you can’t turn back time, you can take preventative measures from here on out and help spread the message for raising melanoma awareness.

Dr. Zeena Al-Dujaili received her medical degree at Tulane University School of Medicine where she was elected to the national medical honor society, Alpha Omega Alpha. Following medical school, Dr. Al-Dujaili completed a dermatology residency at Tulane University. Dr. Al-Dujaili then completed a fellowship in Mohs surgery, lasers, liposuction and vein treatments. She also has extensive training and experience in cosmetic dermatology — including neurotoxins, injectable fillers, and chemical peels. A board-certified dermatologist, she is licensed in New Jersey, New York, and Louisiana. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatologic Surgery and American College of Mohs Surgery.

The Treatments That Helped Me Combat Hair Loss

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Elisabeth is a 13-time Emmy-winner, a critically acclaimed personal finance author and a 20-year consumer advocate for programs such as Good Morning America and The Dr. Oz Show.

Connect with her via Twitter @ElisabethLeamy and on her website, Leamy.com.

Knowing The Root Cause of Thinning Hair Could Be The Key

When the Dr. Oz Show asked me to go undercover and see what hair restoration clinics are promising hopeful patients,  it was personal. You see, in about 2008, I noticed that my own hair was thinning drastically. I’ve included a photo of my once lustrous, bouncy hair below and I admit, I took pride in it. The real tip-off was how I had to move from large ponytail elastics to small ones. Eventually, even those started slipping off. I had diffuse hair loss, with thinning all over my head, and only a hint of the “wide part” that some women struggle with. Nevertheless, I was depressed — and embarrassed — and had to live out my personal loss on national television as I was a correspondent for Good Morning America at the time.
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What You Need to Know About Melanoma

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Written by: Dr. Neil Sadick

Melanoma is the deadliest of skin cancers, mostly because it can spread very quickly and attack organs such as the brain and lungs. The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years, and despite considerable scientific and clinical breakthroughs in treatment, dermatologists will stress that an ounce of prevention is always better than a pound of cure.

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Celebrating Nurses Week 2017: Five Nurses You Should Know

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Physicians are often thrust into the spotlight for the work they do, and often the notoriety is well deserved. However, there are many extraordinary nurses who have equally and dramatically changed the face of health and healthcare through their tireless efforts to serve their communities and make an impact on the world. With Nurses Week 2017 right around the corner, (May 6-12), we honor and celebrate nurses around the globe. From the battleground to the bedside, from offices to surgical suites, from nursing schools to government boardrooms, nurses make decisions daily that impact lives.

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Do You Really Have Fibromyalgia?

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By Dr. David M. Brady

Are you one of tens of millions of individuals silently suffering from widespread pain and fatigue? Have you been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, but recovery seems to elude you? Mass confusion exists over what is truly fibromyalgia and what are the associated syndromes incorrectly diagnosed as fibromyalgia. The common thread of widespread pain and fatigue blurs the lines of distinction, leading to incorrect treatment and poor recovery. Far too often, doctors diagnose a patient with fibromyalgia, when in fact she has a complex set of symptoms with multiple causes. Worse yet, doctors may prescribe a single treatment package, when this one-size-fits-all approach rarely leads to recovery.

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Farm to Hospital: How the Way We Farm Makes Us Sick

Written by: Ron Weiss, MD

Given the recent turn of events, it is unclear whether the Affordable Care Act really has been given a reprieve, or whether millions still risk losing their current health insurance benefits. Regardless, it is critical for the politicians in Washington to understand that the primary cause of America’s health care crisis is not a lack of health insurance. It is not rising drug costs or insufficient access to primary care medicine. It is federal agriculture policy.

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Which Nutrients Best Support Healthy Vision?

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Written by Austin Winegar, AsktheScientists.com

Eye health is an often-overlooked aspect in our journey to overall health, but there are some important nutrients out there that can help support healthy vision.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an antioxidant found in fruits and vegetables. It supports healthy capillaries, gums, teeth, and cartilage. Vitamin C can be found in virtually every cell in the body, and its concentration is significantly higher in the retina than in the blood. Since the human body does not make vitamin C, it must be consumed as part of the diet.*

Zinc
Zinc is a trace mineral that is found in high concentrations in the eye. It plays a critical role in transporting vitamin A to the retina.*

Lutein & Zeaxanthin
Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids and both serve as antioxidants, which help to neutralize free radicals and reduce oxidative stress.*

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Fats are an essential part of the human diet. The two families of essential fatty acids are omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. Most individuals get enough of the essential omega-6 fatty acids; however low intakes of omega-3 fatty acids is common, particularly Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). These fatty acids are important in many aspects of health, including: membrane structure, neural development, supporting cardiovascular health, and providing a healthy inflammation response in connection with exercise.*

DHA is found in high concentrations in the retina and it has been shown that DHA helps maintain the health of the retina.* Read more  »