7 Workout Moves You Can Do on Vacation

running woman exercise
If you are looking to maintain your workout regimen even when you’re on vacation, you are in luck. World-renowned fitness trainer David Kirsch has five easy moves you can try from the comfort of your hotel room, beach house, or anywhere else you rest your head. Just because you are taking a break from your normal routine, doesn’t mean your workouts have to fall to the wayside. Try out these seven moves to find your favorite ones!


Poolside Tips to Help You Feel Your Best

Beatiful Brunette Playing in the Pool

If you are looking to slim down in a sustainable and healthy way, it never hurts to have a few wholesome habits and nutrient-rich foods in your arsenal. By making some simple tweaks to your diet and lifestyle, you can achieve huge results. Below are my favorite tips, tricks, and snacks to have you looking and feeling your best all summer long.


What Is Glioblastoma? A Closer Look at This Aggressive Form of Brain Cancer

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, brain tumor,

Yesterday Senator John McCain’s office announced that he has been diagnosed with a primary brain tumor known as a glioblastoma. The release went on to say that all portions of the tumor visible on imaging have been removed and that the senator and his family were reviewing the next steps. So what exactly is glioblastoma and what are the possible next steps?


Easy Ways to Cultivate Good Health in the Garden


woman gardening

There are many more ways to stay healthy and fit than simply just going to the gym. In fact some options are right in our own backyard. While gardening may not be considered exercise by some, it can actually build or maintain strength, stamina, and flexibility. Some studies have shown that it can also reduce the prevalence of heart disease, obesity, anxiety, and depression and improve one’s perceived quality of life. Some research even indicates gardening reduces the chance of developing Alzheimer’s by 50 percent. Want to learn more?


A Healthy Reset for Everyday People

Glass bottle of spinach juice on wooden table, closeup

Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

Written by Sue Ward, Director of Nutrition at Sanoviv Institute

If you are ready to improve your health, boost energy, shed excess body weight, and improve your appearance, then consider a brief “reset.” This reset plan is about removing potentially harmful substances from our bodies while nourishing ourselves with healthy foods and lifestyle practices.

Here is a simple 7-day reset that can help put you on the path to better health. It includes a simple meal plan — a shake, a salad, and a soup each day; a shake for breakfast, salad for lunch, and soup for dinner. This is an easy-to-follow plan that can be modified to suit individual needs, using the following suggestions. Read more  »

A Closer Look at the Recent News on Coconut Oil


Coconuts and organic coconut oil

This week coconut oil filled the news with headlines like “Worse Than Lard: Researchers Warn Against Trendy Use of Coconut Oil” and “Coconut oil isn’t healthy.  It’s never been healthy.” If you watch what you eat—and you probably do if you are reading this blog—you may be confused, because according to a survey conducted by the AHA, 72% of people think coconut oil is healthy.  So what is the truth?


5 Tips for Fitness Beginners

Runner athlete legs running on stairs. woman fitness jogging workout wellness concept.

By: George & Jamie Hess of @NYCfitfam

Summer is here, and headlines everywhere are screaming at us to be prepared.

“Summer Slim Down!,” they shout.

“Get Beach Body Ready!,” they command.

“Learn How to Pick Your Most Flattering Bikini,” they instruct, assuming you feel anywhere near comfortable enough to don a two-piece.

It’s an easy time to feel overwhelmed, especially if you’re an exercise beginner. It’s also easy to feel frustrated by the washboard abs we see all over social media, leading to a feeling of defeat before you’ve even begun.

Fitness should be about how you feel from the inside out. Beauty is about how you show up in the world, and when you feel good, you look beautiful. Summer is the perfect time to start a fitness routine as a beginner because it’s lovely outside, but most beginners need some guidance and motivation to take that first step.


What You Need to Know About Heart Failure

Doctor drawing ecg heartbeat chart with marker on whiteboard concept for healthcare and medicine

Some 6.5 million Americans are living with heart failure, and nearly a million new cases are diagnosed each year. Despite its prevalence, heart failure symptoms are largely under-recognized, in part because people don’t understand the condition. Find out more about heart failure, and the warnings signs you should be mindful of here.

What is heart failure?

Heart failure is a serious, chronic condition in which the heart muscle is weakened and cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs for blood and oxygen. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should. Heart failure is sometimes described as having a weak heart.

Heart failure is also associated with a lower five-year survival rate following hospital discharge than some cancers (e.g., breast cancer in women and bowel cancer in men). Read more  »

Nutrients You Need to Support Bone Health

Portrait Of Happy Man Pouring Juice In Glass For Young Woman

Written By Austin Winegar, AsktheScientists.com

Even though a variety of nutrients support and maintain bone health, calcium usually gets the most attention. Calcium is essential, but the health of your bones don’t depend on it alone. In fact, magnesium and vitamin D help your body absorb calcium better so it can actually use what you’re taking in. The combination of magnesium and calcium also provides benefits to the body beyond bone health—supporting your heart, muscles, healthy energy metabolism, and more.

Let’s take a look at each of these important nutrients.


Melanoma Awareness Month: Top Prevention Tips


Written by: Dr. Zeena Al-Dujaili

On average, one American dies from melanoma every hour. This disease claims the lives of 10,000 Americans every year, but when it is caught early, survival rates can be more than 90 percent. Although the risk of melanoma increases with age, it is also the most common cancer in young women in their 20s and 30s. Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that results from blistering sunburns in childhood and regular, unprotected sun exposure. Melanoma accounts for only about 1 percent of skin cancers, but results in a large majority of skin cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

May is Melanoma Awareness Month, so, this is the perfect time to go over the key points in detecting and preventing melanoma.

It is important that you have a dermatologist check your skin once a year and that you perform monthly self–skin checks. Make sure to check for a funny-looking spot or a change in your skin. When performing a skin check, it is useful to follow the ABCDEs of mole evaluation, looking for Asymmetry, Border irregularity, Color variation, change in Diameter larger than 6mm, and Evolution or change in appearance. Melanoma is most likely to present itself on the backs of men and the legs of women, but it can also occur in non-sun-exposed areas, such as the scalp, on the bottoms of the feet or in the eye.

Those with fair skin and a family history of melanoma are most at risk for the disease. It is important to protect yourself by wearing sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher, sunglasses, and protective clothing. Also, avoiding peak sun hours (10 AM–2 PM) and UV tanning beds is important in the prevention of melanoma. Studies have demonstrated that women younger than 30 are six times more likely to develop melanoma if they tan indoors. Research has also demonstrated that even people who do not burn after indoor tanning or sun exposure are at an increased risk of melanoma if they tan indoors. While you can’t turn back time, you can take preventative measures from here on out and help spread the message for raising melanoma awareness.

Dr. Zeena Al-Dujaili received her medical degree at Tulane University School of Medicine where she was elected to the national medical honor society, Alpha Omega Alpha. Following medical school, Dr. Al-Dujaili completed a dermatology residency at Tulane University. Dr. Al-Dujaili then completed a fellowship in Mohs surgery, lasers, liposuction and vein treatments. She also has extensive training and experience in cosmetic dermatology — including neurotoxins, injectable fillers, and chemical peels. A board-certified dermatologist, she is licensed in New Jersey, New York, and Louisiana. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatologic Surgery and American College of Mohs Surgery.